UK Government Plans To Ban Wet Wipes

Wet Wipes Saved From Oceans & Sewers: 1 401 349

Hemorrhoids Treatment & Home Remedy Guidelines

Hemorrhoids are part of normal human anatomy, we all have them. Hemorrhoids don’t cause pain normally, only infected hemorrhoids hurt. To prevent infection, it’s very important to have a very good daily hygiene. Approximately 50% to 66% of people have problems with hemorrhoids at some point in their lives. Males and females are both affected with about equal frequency. Try these simple tips for hemorrhoids that will make you feel so much better:

1. Good Personal Hygiene
Although the reason isn’t clear, some studies show a correlation between having a clean bum and hemorrhoids—in favor of personal hygiene, of course. In one study of 138 people, scientists found washing up after you poop and cleaning your bottom in the shower had a significant effect on whether study participants got hemorrhoids.
Doctors advice patients to take shower or use toilet paper moistener every time after number 2 to prevent infection. If taking shower is not possible, then SATU toilet paper gel is a great solution designed to help reduce risk of infection. You can buy SATU gel from pharmacies or Amazon US & Amazon UK.
Use hemorrhoid cream after shower. Ask your doctor which one is right for you.

2. Witch Hazel
Witch hazel is reputed to reduce pain, itching and bleeding until hemorrhoids fade out. There isn’t much scientific support for its use, but it does contain tannins and oils that may help bring down inflammation and slow bleeding. Supporters say it tightens the skin as a natural anti-inflammatory.

3. Keep the anal area clean
Keep the anal area clean. Bathe (preferably) or shower daily to cleanse the skin around your anus gently with warm water. Gently pat the area dry or use a hair dryer.

4. Don’t use dry toilet paper
As it might cause micro cuts and irritate skin. To help keep the anal area clean after a bowel movement, use moist towelettes or toilet paper with gel.

5. Warm baths
According Harvard Health, taking a warm bath for 20 minutes after every bowel movement will be most effective. Warm baths can help soothe the irritation from hemorrhoids. You can use a sitz bath, which is a small plastic tub that fits over a toilet seat or take a full-body bath in your tub. Adding Epsom salts to the bath can provide further relief by reducing pain.

6. Gel Wipe
Be gentle. If toilet paper is irritating, try adding gel to it first. Using toilet paper after a bowel movement can aggravate existing hemorrhoids. Gel Wipe can help keep you clean without causing further irritation.

7. Cold compresses
Applying ice or cold packs to the hemorrhoid may also help relieve pain and inflammation. Applying an ice pack while seated or when the hemorrhoid flares up can help numb pain and temporarily reduce swelling. Be sure to wrap the ice in a small towel to avoid damage to the skin.

8. Don’t scratch
You could damage the skin and make the irritation — and the itching — worse.

9. Over-the-counter medications
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen may help. Applying creams to the skin that contain ingredients such as hydrocortisone could provide temporary relief as well.

10. Loose, cotton clothing
Choose cotton. Wear loose, soft underwear. It keeps the area aired out and stops moisture from building up, which can bother your hemorrhoids and increase chance of infection.

11. Stool softeners
According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, stool softeners or fiber supplements, like psyllium, can help reduce constipation, make stool softer, and make it easier to have quick, painless bowel movements.

12. Eat lots of high-fiber foods
Especially from plants and drink plenty of water to keep the digestive process moving correctly and prevent constipation. Regular exercise and avoiding sitting for long periods of time can also help prevent hemorrhoids.

13. Avoid constipation
The most effective way to avoid constipation is to go to the bathroom when you first feel the urge. Delaying a bowel movement allows the bowel to reabsorb water from the stool. This makes stool harder when you finally do go.

14. Limit your time on the throne
If you don’t go after a few minutes, don’t wait or force something to happen. Try to get into a routine where you go at the same time every day.

15. Use a pillow
Sit on a cushion instead of a hard surface. It will ease swelling for any hemorrhoids you have. It may also help prevent new ones from forming.

16. Take breaks
If you must sit for a long time, get up every hour and move around for at least 5 minutes.

17. Make a doctor’s appointment
It is important to consult a professional who can give you best advice.

Read how to prevent hemorrhoids from here.

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