UK Government Plans To Ban Wet Wipes

Wet Wipes Saved From Oceans & Sewers: 1 401 349

Estonian start-up competes with large companies for international innovation award

The Estonian start-up SATU Laboratory rubbed shoulders with much larger companies in a prestigious international innovation competition held in Brussels last night with its product Gel Wipe, which is designed for the cleaning and moisturizing of bottoms. SATU was one of the six finalists for the Pulp and Paper International prize in the Tissue Innovation category – the most prestigious award in the pulp and paper industry. The winning finalist was Papelera San Andres de Giles from Argentina. Alongside the winner, SATU was invited to speak at a conference taking place in Italy next year.

What makes the gel created by the Estonian start-up innovative is that it can be used with almost any kind of toilet paper without the paper falling apart. Moreover, it does not clog up pipes or do any harm to nature when it finds its way into the environment.

The annual PPI International awards were presented in 10 categories yesterday in the Belgian capital, with the Estonian start-up nominated in the Innovation category alongside such well-known companies as SCA from Sweden and Kimberly-Clark from the United States. SATU Laboratory earned its place in the final thanks to its innovative approach – an environmentally and body-friendly gel that can be applied to toilet paper to clean and moisturize the bottom.

Siim Saat, the CEO of SATU, was proud to see a tiny Estonian start-up competing in the international arena against companies earning tens of billions of dollars. “The problems that wet wipes have been causing to sewers and the environment have become a major issue of late, but Gel Wipe is a potential solution to that problem,” he said. “Making it to the final six in such a prestigious competition is a huge achievement for us, all the more so when you consider we were battling it out against big companies with massive turnovers. The international recognition it’s earned us is both confirmation that we’re on the right track and inspiration to explore it further.”

Starting from today, Gel Wipe is now also available from Amazon.

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